sumo-scan

What the script does

This script scans an existing EPICS support module directory tree and collects all information necessary to generate a dependency database DEPS.DB file. The data is formatted in JSON format and printed to the console. You can either save this output in a file or combine this script with sumo db in a pipe to directly create a DEPS.DB file.

The script takes one or mode commands and has a number of options. Single character options always start with a single dash “-”, long options start with a double dash “–”, commands are simple words on the command line.

How it works

The program collects information in several phases. The output of each phase is taken as an input for the next phase. If you use the command “all”, the first three phases are run at a time. If you run some phases alone by using the commands “deps”, “groups” or “repos” you have to provide the input of a phase from a file by using the command line option --info-file.

All three phases that are needed to create the data for generating a dependency database with sumo db are combined with the command “all”.

Two other phases “name2paths” and “path2names” are implemented to get information on the existing module support tree but are not needed to create a dependency database.

Phase I, RELEASE file scanning

Information on dependencies of EPICS modules is stored in files named “RELEASE” in directory “configure”. For each module the module depends on, there is a variable with a path. This is a short example of what you could find in a RELEASE file:

SUPPORT=/opt/Epics/R3.14.8/support
MISC=$(SUPPORT)/misc/2-4
ALARM=$(SUPPORT)/alarm/3-1
SOFT=$(SUPPORT)/soft/2-2

The script calls “make” for each “RELEASE” file found to generate a list of all generated variables. By calling make it is ensured that all macros, e.g. “SUPPORT” in the example above, are resolved. By calling “make” twice, one time without and one time with the “RELEASE” file the script computes a difference of the set of defined variables of both runs. This difference contains all the changes in variables that are caused by parsing the “RELEASE” file.

From this set of variable names and values the script removes names which match a given list. For example, “TOP” usually refers to a directory that is not an EPICS support.

The remaining variable definitions are assumed to be module dependencies.

The program builds a map where the keys are absolute paths of support modules. The values are maps which map variable names to absolute paths which are in fact the module’s dependencies. Here is a short JSON example of the created data structure:

{
    "dependencies": {
        "/srv/csr/Epics/R3.14.8/support/alarm/3-3": {
            "EPICS_BASE": "/srv/csr/Epics/R3.14.8/base/3-14-8-2-0",
            "MISC": "/srv/csr/Epics/R3.14.8/support/misc/2-4",
            "TIMER": "/srv/csr/Epics/R3.14.8/support/bspDep/timer/4-0"
        },
        "/srv/csr/Epics/R3.14.8/support/alarm/3-4": {
            "EPICS_BASE": "/srv/csr/Epics/R3.14.8/base/3-14-8-2-0",
            "MISC": "/srv/csr/Epics/R3.14.8/support/misc/2-4",
            "TIMER": "/srv/csr/Epics/R3.14.8/support/bspDep/timer/5-0"
        },
        "/srv/csr/Epics/R3.14.8/support/csm/3-2": {
            "EPICS_BASE": "/srv/csr/Epics/R3.14.8/base/3-14-8-2-0"
        },
        "/srv/csr/Epics/R3.14.8/support/csm/3-3": {
            "EPICS_BASE": "/srv/csr/Epics/R3.14.8/base/3-14-8-2-0"
        },
    }
}

Phase II, Grouping

In this phase the program tries to build groups of modules. A group is a collection all the versions of a support module. This is done by parsing module paths. The program assumes that each module has a path of the form “[BASEDIR]/[MODULEPATH]/[VERSION]”. [VERSION] is simply the last part of the path that contains no slashes “/”. [BASEDIR] is given as a command line option to the program (see option --group-basedir) and [MODULEPATH] is all that remains of the path. In order to create a modulename the program changes all characters in [MODULEPATH] to uppercase and replaces all slashes “/” with underscore “_” characters. Here is an example of the created datastructure in JSON format:

{
    "groups": {
        "AGILENT": {
            "/srv/csr/Epics/R3.14.8/support/agilent": [
                "2-0",
                "2-1",
                "2-2",
                "head"
            ]
        },
        "ALARM": {
            "/srv/csr/Epics/R3.14.8/support/alarm": [
                "3-0",
                "3-1",
                "3-2",
                "3-3",
                "3-4",
                "3-5",
                "base-3-14"
            ]
        },
    }
}

Phase III, repository scan

Usually your support modules are managed by a version control system. Currently the program supports darcs, mercurial, git, subversion and cvs.

In each module the program looks for the data of a supported version control system. If no version control data is found, the program marks the source of the module as a path meaning that sumo build <reference-sumo> will copy the sources from exactly that path.

If version control data is found the program it looks for a repository tag. It only accepts a tag if it matches the last part of the support module path. The program creates a version number from both, the path and the tag and only if this number is equal, the tag is accepted. Here are some examples:

path tag tag accepted
/Epics/support/NewDyncon/3-1 R3-1 yes
/Epics/support/NewDyncon/3-0 ver-3-0 yes
/Epics/support/NewDyncon/2-9 R2-8 no
/Epics/support/NewDyncon/2-7 R2-8 no

The program also looks for the path of the foreign repository, this is assumed to be the central repository we should refer to. If this is not found, the program takes the path of the working copy as the source repository. In this case, any version tag is ignored.

Here is an example of the generated data in JSON format:

{
   "repos": {
      "/srv/csr/Epics/R3.14.10/base/3-14-10-0-1": {
          "darcs": {
              "tag": "R3-14-10-0-1",
              "url": "rcsadm@aragon.acc.bessy.de:/opt/repositories/controls/darcs/epics/base/3-14-10"
          }
      },
      "/srv/csr/Epics/R3.14.12/base/3-14-12-2-1": {
          "darcs": {
              "url": "rcsadm@aragon.acc.bessy.de:/opt/repositories/controls/darcs/epics/base/3-14-12-2"
          }
      },
      "/srv/csr/Epics/R3.14.8/support/apps/wlsSupport/work": {
          "path": "rcsadm@aragon.acc.bessy.de:/opt/Epics/R3.14.8/support/apps/wlsSupport/work"
      },
      "/srv/csr/Epics/R3.14.8/support/NewDyncon/3-0": {
          "darcs": {
              "tag": "R3-0",
              "url": "rcsadm@aragon.acc.bessy.de:/opt/repositories/controls/darcs/epics/support/dyncon"
          }
      },
      "/srv/csr/Epics/R3.14.8/support/NewDyncon/3-1": {
          "darcs": {
              "tag": "R3-1",
              "url": "rcsadm@aragon.acc.bessy.de:/opt/repositories/controls/darcs/epics/support/dyncon"
          }
      }
    }
}

Optional

Optional Phase IV, name to paths map

This optional phase that is started with the command “name2paths” creates a map that shows what paths were found for modules. Here is an example of the created datastructure in JSON format:

{
    "name2paths": {
        "ALARM": [
            "/srv/csr/Epics/R3.14.8/support/alarm/3-2",
            "/srv/csr/Epics/R3.14.8/support/alarm/3-3",
            "/srv/csr/Epics/R3.14.8/support/alarm/3-5"
        ],
        "MOTOR": [
            "/srv/csr/Epics/R3.14.8/support/motor/6-4-4-1",
            "/srv/csr/Epics/R3.14.8/support/motor/6-5-1",
            "/srv/csr/Epics/R3.14.8/support/motor/6-5-2",
            "/srv/csr/Epics/R3.14.8/support/synApps/5-1-1-0/support/motor/5-9",
            "/srv/csr/Epics/R3.14.8/support/synApps/5-2-0-1/support/motor/6-1",
            "/srv/csr/Epics/R3.14.8/support/synApps/5-2-0/support/motor/6-1",
            "/srv/csr/Epics/R3.14.8/support/synApps/5-4-1/support/motor/6-4-3",
        ],
    }
}

Optional Phase V, paths to names map

This optional phase that is started with the command “path2names” creates a map that shows what module names were used for what module paths. Here is an example of the created datastructure in JSON format:

{
    "path2names": {
        "/srv/csr/Epics/R3.14.8/support/alarm/3-0": [
            "ALARM"
        ],
        "/srv/csr/Epics/R3.14.8/support/alarm/3-1": [
            "ALARM"
        ],
        "/srv/csr/Epics/R3.14.8/support/alarm/3-2": [
            "ALARM"
        ],
        "/srv/csr/Epics/R3.14.8/support/synApps/5-2-0-1/support/genSub/1-6a": [
            "GENSUB",
            "GEN_SUB"
        ],
    }
}

Program output

The output of all phases that are run is combined in a single JSON datastructure that is printed on the console.

From the paths of each RELEASE file, a module name is constructed. Each path of a support module from a RELEASE is added to the list of dependencies of that module.

Since all the consecutive calls of “make” may take some time, the results of the RELEASE file scan can be saved as a file and used later on with other commands like “path2names” or “groups”. This is the meaning of the -i or --info-file option.

Commands

This is a list of all commands. Note that if no command is provided, the program assumes command “all”. This is the command you want to use in most cases.

config list

List all configuration files that were loaded.

config show [OPTIONNAMES]

Show the configuration in JSON format. OPTIONNAMES is an optional list of long option names. If OPTIONNAMES are specified, only options from this list are saved in the configuration file.

config make FILENAME [OPTIONNAMES]

Create a new configuration file from the options read from configuration files and options from the command line. If FILENAME is ‘-‘ dump to the console. OPTIONNAMES is an optional list of long option names. If OPTIONNAMES are specified, only options from this list are saved in the configuration file.

all

This is the most important command. “all” combines the commands “deps”, “groups” and “repos”. The output of the commands is combined in a single large JSON structure and printed to the console. You can use the output of this command as input for sumo db in order to create a dependency database.

deps

This command collects dependencies from all “RELEASE” files and returns the structure in JSON format. For details see Phase I, RELEASE file scanning.

groups

This command collects modules of the same name but of different versions in groups. For details see Phase II, Grouping.

repos

This command collects information about repositories and returns the structure in JSON format. For details see Phase III, repository scan.

name2paths

This command shows what module paths were found for module names. You do not need this command in order to generate a dependency database. For details see Optional Phase IV, name to paths map.

path2names

This command shows what module names were used for what module paths. You do not need this command in order to generate a dependency database. For details see Optional Phase V, paths to names map.

Options

Here is a short overview on command line options:

--version
show program’s version number and exit
-h, --help
show this help message and exit
--summary
Print a summary of the function of the program.
--test
Perform some self tests.
-c FILE, --config FILE
Load options from the given configuration file. You can specify more than one of these. Unless –no-default-config is given, the program always loads configuration files from several standard directories first before it loads your configuration file. The contents of all configuration files are merged.
-C, --no-default-config
If this option is given the program doesn’t load the default configuration.
--disable-loading
If given, disable execution of load commands like ‘#preload’ in configuration files. In this case these keys are treated like ordinary keys.
-A, --append OPTIONNAME
If an option with name OPTIONNAME is given here and it is a list option, the list from the command line is appended to the list from the configuration file. The default is that options from the command line override option values from the configuration file.
--#preload FILES
Specify a an ‘#preload’ directive in the configuration file. This option has only a meaning if a configuration file is created with the ‘makeconfig’ command. ‘#preload’ means that the following file(s) are loaded before the rest of the configuration file.
--#opt-preload FILES
This option does the same as –#preload but the file loading is optional. If they do not exist the program continues without an error.
--#postload FILES
Specify a an ‘#postload’ directive in the configuration file. This option has only a meaning if a configuration file is created with the ‘makeconfig’ command. ‘#postload’ means that the following file(s) are loaded after the rest of the configuration file.
--#opt-postload FILES
This option does the same as –#postload but the file loading is optional. If they do not exist the program continues without an error.
-d DIR, --dir DIR
Parse all RELEASE files in directory DIR. You can specify more than one of these by repeating this option or by joining values in a single string separated by spaces. A default for this option can be put in a configuration file.
-i INFOFILE, --info-file INFOFILE
Read information from INFOFILE. This is a file generated by this script in a prevous run.
-N NAME, --ignore-name NAME
Define names of variables in RELEASE files that should be ignored. You usually want to ignore the names like ‘TOP’ or ‘SUPPORT’. You can specify more than one of these by repeating this option or by joining values in a single string separated by spaces. A default for this option can be put in a configuration file. If this option isn’t provided, the program uses these defaults: TOP EPICS_SUPPORT SUPPORT MSI TEMPLATE_TOP
-g DIR, --group-basedir DIR
Option “-g” or “–group-basedir” must be followed by a directory name. It defines the part of the directory path that is the same for all support modules. This is needed in order to generate a module name from the module’s directory path. You can specify more than one of these by repeating this option or by joining values in a single string separated by spaces. A default for this option can be put in a configuration file. Directories (option –dir) are always appended to the list of group-basedirs.
--exclude-path REGEXP
Exclude all paths that match REGEXP from dependencies. You can specify more than one of these by repeating this option or by joining values in a single string separated by spaces. A default for this option can be put in a configuration file.
--exclude-deps REGEXP
Exclude all paths whose dependencies match REGEXP. A default for this option can be put in a configuration file.
--ignore-changes REGEXP
Ignore all uncomitted changes in files that match the REGEXP. Usually uncomitted changes mean that we cannot use the repository as such but must copy the whole directory (source type is always ‘path’). A common application for this option is to ignore changes in ‘configure/RELEASE’. You can specify more than one of these by repeating this option or by joining values in a single string separated by spaces. A default for this option can be put in a configuration file.
-D EXPRESSION, --dir-patch EXPRESSION
Specify a directory patchexpression. Such an expression consists of a tuple of 2 python strings. The first is the match expression, the second one is the replacement string. The regular expression is applied to every source path generated. You can specify more than one patchexpression. A default for this option can be put in a configuration file.
-U EXPRESSION, --url-patch EXPRESSION
Specify a repository url patchexpression. Such an expression consists of a tuple of 2 python strings. The first is the match expression, the second one is the replacement string. The regular expression is applied to every source url generated. You can specify more than one patchexpression. A default for this option can be put in a configuration file.
--hint HINT
Specify a HINT. A HINT has the form REGEXP,FLAG{,FLAG}. REGEXP is a regular expression that is matched with the module path. FLAG is a string that gives hints how to treat that module. You can specify more than one hint. A default for this option can be put in a configuration file.
--missing-tag
Show directories where a repository was found but no tag. A default for this option can be put in a configuration file.
--missing-repo
Show directories where no repository was found. A default for this option can be put in a configuration file.
-t BUILDTAG, --buildtag BUILDTAG
Scan only directories of the given buildtag.
-p, --progress
Show progress on stderr. A default for this option can be put in a configuration file.
-t, --trace
Switch on some trace messages.
--exceptions
On fatal errors that raise python exceptions, don’t catch these. This will show a python stacktrace instead of an error message and may be useful for debugging the program.”
-v, --verbose
Show command calls. A default for this option can be put in a configuration file
-n, --dry-run
Just show what the program would do.